Sunday, January 19, 2020

computers and life :: essays research papers

Life in a modern technologhy requires skills in dealing with computers...CH 8 Network Management. 8.1 Network Documentation. *Cut sheet diagrams. The first and most critical component for a good network is documentation. Documentation is the most talked about and least performed task in a network. à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · diagrams that indicate the path of the physical wiring layout; à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · the type of cable; à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · the length of each cable; à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · the type of termination for the cable; à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · physical location of each wall plate or patch panel, and; à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · A labeling scheme for easy identification of each wire. * MDF and IDF layouts This is a Physical and logical layout of the Main Distribution Facility and all of the Intermediate Distribution Facilities in the network, layout of rack mounts, auxiliary equipment, and servers in the distribution facility, patch panel labels to identify cable terminations. Identification and configuration details of all equipment located in the distribution facility. *Server and workstation configuration details This is any physical detail of the computer, model and serial number, Physical location, user, and network identification. *Software listings Standard and special software used on each machine in the network. This list includes operating system and application software. *Maintenance records It is also valuable to keep a list of all repairs that have been done to all equipment included in the network. This will help an administrator predict possible future problems with existing hardware and software. *Security measures Includes "soft" security, such as user rights, password definition, and firewall support, but also physical security. Physical or hard security includes things as simple as identifying how the MDF and IDF's are locked, who has access to these rooms and why, how the hosts are protected (security cables - alarms), and who has physical access to the system. *User policies They contain how the users can interact with the network. These policies include what is and what is not permissible on the network. It should also include what the consequences of violating user policies will be. Other aspects of user policies include what minimum user ID and password length should be, and rules for the content of passwords. 8.2 Network Security includes the following. * Network access It involves making the network as secure as possible against unauthorized access. This is done by establishing security policies, such as minimum password length, maximum password age, unique passwords (not allowing the same password repeated), and only allowing the user to logon to the network at particular times of the day or days of the week. computers and life :: essays research papers Life in a modern technologhy requires skills in dealing with computers...CH 8 Network Management. 8.1 Network Documentation. *Cut sheet diagrams. The first and most critical component for a good network is documentation. Documentation is the most talked about and least performed task in a network. à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · diagrams that indicate the path of the physical wiring layout; à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · the type of cable; à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · the length of each cable; à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · the type of termination for the cable; à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · physical location of each wall plate or patch panel, and; à ¯Ã¢â‚¬Å¡Ã‚ · A labeling scheme for easy identification of each wire. * MDF and IDF layouts This is a Physical and logical layout of the Main Distribution Facility and all of the Intermediate Distribution Facilities in the network, layout of rack mounts, auxiliary equipment, and servers in the distribution facility, patch panel labels to identify cable terminations. Identification and configuration details of all equipment located in the distribution facility. *Server and workstation configuration details This is any physical detail of the computer, model and serial number, Physical location, user, and network identification. *Software listings Standard and special software used on each machine in the network. This list includes operating system and application software. *Maintenance records It is also valuable to keep a list of all repairs that have been done to all equipment included in the network. This will help an administrator predict possible future problems with existing hardware and software. *Security measures Includes "soft" security, such as user rights, password definition, and firewall support, but also physical security. Physical or hard security includes things as simple as identifying how the MDF and IDF's are locked, who has access to these rooms and why, how the hosts are protected (security cables - alarms), and who has physical access to the system. *User policies They contain how the users can interact with the network. These policies include what is and what is not permissible on the network. It should also include what the consequences of violating user policies will be. Other aspects of user policies include what minimum user ID and password length should be, and rules for the content of passwords. 8.2 Network Security includes the following. * Network access It involves making the network as secure as possible against unauthorized access. This is done by establishing security policies, such as minimum password length, maximum password age, unique passwords (not allowing the same password repeated), and only allowing the user to logon to the network at particular times of the day or days of the week.

Saturday, January 11, 2020

Good Manger

Chapter 1 Summary Laura Chase is killed instantly in a car accident. Laura's sister must go to the morgue to identify the body, and readers are given an idea of the woman Laura's sister is. She is careful, deliberate, and knows that she must dress appropriately in case newspaper reporters are nearby. She must do anything fitting her position as the wife of Mr. Richard E. Griffen. Especially since the car in which Laura Chase died belonged to Mrs. Richard E. Griffen.Laura's sister decides to wear black, of course, and she must also wear gloves, a veil, and should bring a handkerchief. When Laura's sister opens a drawer in her dressing room, she comes across a stack of school examination notebooks that have been bound in kitchen string. When she lifts the notebooks out, the shock of Laura's death hits her. Chapter 2 Summary Sub-Novel There are two main characters in the sub-novel: the man and woman. Clandestine meetings occur between them and the relationship is in its infancy. The wom an is described as â€Å"nervous. She is married but he is single. Details are dropped into the narrative like toppings on an ice cream sundae – the color of the woman's dress, the kind of tree that sits outside her bedroom window – and these things will be clues to the identities of the man and woman later on. Additionally, news clips, interspersed between vignettes, keep readers on a linear time path with the main novel. Also in this chapter are stories within stories. The woman and man meet several times and in varied places: over lunch, in a park, at night under a bridge.Chapter 3 Summary Main Novel It is June, 1998 and Iris Chase Griffen is about to present the Laura Chase Creative Writing Award to a graduating senior at Port Ticonderoga High School. Readers get to know Iris a bit better throughout the narrative. The death of her sister Laura, which she describes as being as close to a suicide as the word damn is to swearing, is an old wound that still bleeds. He r representation of the Chase family in the presentation of this monetary award is very difficult for her.Iris reminisces about her sister's life, how the story in the sub-novel created a town furor worthy of book banning, and how Iris has withstood the worst of this upset for the past 50 years. Yet, Laura is also seen as a genius taken in the prime of her life – a genius that Iris wears like a hair shirt. Chapter 4 Summary Sub-Novel The man and woman continue to meet in secret. At a cafe, she is uncomfortable because of the part of town in which it is located, and he is uncomfortable with the â€Å"fancy† way she is dressed.Their togetherness, for him, is about sex; their togetherness, for her, is about what is missing in her marriage: love and respect. The two of them leave the cafe and go to a room he is borrowing from a friend. It is threadbare, worn, and shabby. The woman is again uncomfortable in this environment but is so needy for what the man can give her that she stays. They make-love and he continues telling her the science-fiction tale about the residents of Sakiel-Norn. In another instance, at another time, the man and woman meet in a friend's apartment where they again make love, and again, he continues telling the story. Chapter 5 SummaryMain Novel This chapter volleys between present-day and the mid-1920s through the late 1930s in the history of the Chase family. Readers are permitted the chance to know Iris as an old woman and also get to know how Iris came to be that old woman. It is 1925 and Liliana Chase has died after the premature birth of her third child. Iris is saddled with caring for Laura and knows that it is going to be a full-time job. Even though Reenie acts in a motherly fashion toward both girls, it is Iris who tends to Laura's everyday needs. They must be each other's best friend, because they are not permitted to go off the grounds of Avilion alone.It is during this time that Iris tries to figure out why her moth er died as well as how to explain to Laura what happened to the â€Å"unfinished† baby t Chapter 6 Summary Sub-Novel The man and woman continue to meet in a variety of borrowed places: a dingy room, an opulent apartment and a janitor's storeroom in the basement of a building. The woman is clearly out of her element and comments so to herself while she goes to meet the man. She feels out of place in body and spirit: her clothes are too fancy, her walk is too refined and her attitude is too uptown for the downtown surroundings.However, she clearly loves this man, or certainly loves the image of him. He tries to appear nonchalant, but even he grows restless when he thinks she is not coming to meet him. Theirs is a relationship that starts out purely physical but melds into one of need. In addition, as the book continues, readers are left to wonder who this woman is: Laura or Iris? Chapter 7 Summary Main Novel More of Iris's mystery begins to unravel with the opening of Chapter 7 . She possesses a steamer trunk – one from her 1935 honeymoon trip to Europe with Richard Griffen – full of handwritten text and a couple of first edition books.It is hinted that Laura wrote these, but the question does arise: did Iris actually write stories, including the sub-novel? Many have written to Iris in hopes of interviewing her about her dead sister but she has steadfastly refused. She keeps the existence and contents of the steamer trunk a secret from the world. On a trip into Toronto to see her lawyer, Iris asks Walter to drive her past her old home – the one she shared with Richard as a newly married woman. It is still there, and now has tendrils of ivy fingering up the brickwork. Chapter 8 Summary Sub-Novel The man and woman continue meeting and telling each other stories.They debate over the ending of the story of the blind assassin and the tongueless girl. The woman wants a happy ending, where the two will live out their years together; the man w ould like to see everyone, including the lovers, annihilated. The storytelling between the man and woman is intellectual foreplay. At another rendezvous, the man tells a nicer story, at the urging of the woman. It is about the Lizard Men of Xenor and their coupling with women of Earth to create a super race. The woman tells the man that she is going away on the maiden voyage cruise of the Queen Mary.It is becoming clearer that the woman is Iris Griffen. Chapter 9 Summary Main Novel The elderly Iris is losing the battle all older people fight: to maintain independence at home. Iris's mind is still sharp but her body is letting her down. She cannot even do her own laundry in the basement without fearing she will fall and be hurt. Elderly Iris is also fighting off the ministrations of Myra who dotes on her as though she inherited her from her mother, Reenie. Myra means well but smothers Iris all the same. Her latest idea is to hire someone to clean Iris's house and do laundry for her.H owever, Iris does not want a stranger touching her underwear. It is the spring of 1936; the Civil War had begun in Spain, King Edward had abdicated the throne for the Duchess of Windsor, and Laura had headed off to school. T Chapter 10 Summary Sub-Novel The woman misses the man desperately and looks high and low for some sign of him; something to tell her that he is safe. She finds their story, The Lizard Men of Xenor, in a newsstand at a train station. She secretly sneaks it home and cherishes it as though he were reaching his hand out to her and her alone.Waiting for him to return from Spain seems interminable and, to pass the time, she imagines him imagining her. In her mind's eye, she sees him on trains, in stations and in diners. Her salvation is that he is on his way home to her, only her, and that he will soon emerge through the mist of a departing train to save her from her own life. Chapter 11 Summary Main Novel As the story progresses, readers are treated to little hints, tiny secrets here and there. Iris likes to visit the middle stall in the washroom of a local doughnut shop.That is where the best graffiti is written (including some about Laura) — and where she would like to add some of her own. She checks into that stall regularly to see what has been written there, as one would get a weekly update to a news item. Laura was sent to a different school — same temperament, different uniform — and plans were laid by Winifred for Laura's debut the following year when she turned eighteen. Laura grudgingly attended school but hated it. Once Laura started to be a bigger burden than Winifred wanted Richard to bear, it was decided that Laura should be married.Chapter 12 Summary Sub-Novel The man returns from the war in Spain and is greeted at the train station by the woman. Because he has not yet rented a room, they go to a seedy hotel to be alone together after such a long time apart. The room in the hotel is the worst place they have ever been together. It smells bad, the furniture is tacky and ripped and there is no fresh air. She tells him that she found The Lizard Men of Xenor and waited, impatiently, for the next episode so that she knew he was all right. She had worried about him dying in the war, and he tells her that nearly happened.Chapter 13 Summary Main Novel, the 1930s Just before World War II, Iris' marriage to Richard was getting worse. She had suffered two miscarriages and learned that Richard had enjoyed his share of mistresses. She assumed these dalliances were with his secretaries who were always very young and very pretty. They kept up marital appearances by going to parties and gatherings and Iris was grateful that Richard was no longer bothering her for marital obligations. Once World War II broke out, Richard and his business were in a bad place.He had been too friendly with the Germans prior to the war and stood to lose a lot of money. Following the end of the war, Iris receives a call from Laura. Back in Toronto, Iris sees Laura at Diana Sweets, one of Iris's favorite shops. Chapter 14 Summary Main Novel, the late 1940s Iris finds old school exercise books after Laura dies. In the mathematics book, there appears a long column of numbers with words opposite some of them. Iris recognizes the numbers as dates. The first date coincides with Iris's return from Europe and the last day was just a few months before Laura was sent to Bella Vista.Iris concludes that these are the dates Richard raped Laura. Iris was grateful that Laura had never seen Aimee because she would have known right away that Aimee was Alex Thomas's daughter and not Richard's. Iris keeps all of Laura's notebooks, bound together with string, plus other manuscript pages in the steamer trunk once used in her wedding trousseau. After Laura's funeral, Iris leaves Richard. She sends the steamer trunk out to Port Ticonderoga and then takes Aimee away while Richard is gone on business. Chapter 15 Summary Sub-No velIris is seen cherishing the photo of her and Alex Thomas at the Button Factory picnic that hot, humid Labor Day in the mid-1930s. The picture was of happiness, but the ensuing story was not. Just before her death, Iris has one last daydream. It is of reuniting with Sabrina, one in which Sabrina does not blame her for her fate. Sabrina calls Iris, comes to her house and sits with her. On May 29, 1999, Iris Chase Griffen dies at the age of 83. Shortly thereafter, Sabrina returns from traveling abroad to see to her grandmother's affairs

Friday, January 3, 2020

Essay about Vygotskys Zone of Proximal Development

Teaching is not just a matter of standing in front of a class and distributing knowledge to a group of learners. Teaching is a much more complex procedure that requires educators to consider a variety of educational components in order to maximize a learner’s true potential. Teachers are responsible for catering to the needs of a group of learners with a range of needs, and therefore have an obligation to meet the needs of learners with differing levels of ability, knowledge, understanding, pre-exposure and background using a variety of strategies including scaffolding. Teacher’s also need to consider the varying speed at which students learn, and then be able to provide for all learners regardless of their learning pace and ability as†¦show more content†¦al, 2011) Vygotsky believed that â€Å"instruction is only useful when it moves ahead of development.† (Leong, 1998) According to Morrissey and Brown, 2009 the improvements within the Zone of Proximal Development can be considered with regards to the rate or nature of the progress within the zone, such as whether the learner moves efficiently through a task. For example, when teachers consider a task such as group reading in the classroom, the teacher needs to analyse the needs and reading abilities of students so that they are grouped to read within their Zone of Proximal Development and therefore, the level of support is adjusted to meet the needs of the learners. (Ankrum, Genest and Bel Castro, 2014) Morrissey and Brown, 2009 also suggests that giftedness within children may advance their development in regards to their Zone of Proximal Development. ‘Scaffolding’ is a term used in education to describe the process of modelling and instructing learners to participate in the learning process without providing a direct answer to any given problem. Some techniques that can be included in the scaffolding process include direct explanation to the learner, explicit modelling of the concept being taught to theShow MoreRelatedVygotskys Zone of Proximal Development Essay633 Words   |  3 PagesA child is truly nurtured by those more wise than themselves. I like Vygotsky’s theory that they â€Å"†¦learn through a social process that occures in a particular space and time that reflects the beliefs, politics and practices of the adults around them.† (Ramsey, 2004 pg. 30) I believe this becomes apparent when a child is learning a new task, emotions, behavorial conditions, academics etc.. and learns this process with a mentor around. When approaching the topic of multicultural education and anti-biasRead MoreV ygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development Self Efficacy Agency 622 Words   |  3 PagesIn Vygotsky’s concept, zone of proximal development he explains that it is the distance between a child’s developmental level, which is determined by independent problem solving and the level of potential development as determined through problem solving under adult guidance (Vygotsky, 1978, p174). This concept is highly used in education and in classrooms. For example, I work with a student who is eighteen years of age and has intellectual disabilities. During our morning routine he enjoys workingRead MoreEDFE101 ASSESSMENT 3- MAJOR ESSAY How can Vygotsky’s notion of the ‘Zone of Proximal Development’,1400 Words   |  6 PagesEDFE101 ASSESSMENT 3- MAJOR ESSAY How can Vygotsky’s notion of the ‘Zone of Proximal Development’, and the related concept of ‘scaffolding’, be used to provide appropriate education and support to the full range of students in the classroom? The Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) is a concept by Lev Vygotsky that provides appropriate education and support to the full range of students in the classroom. This concept requires teachers or ‘experts’ to assist students in achieving a higher level ofRead MoreVygotsky s Theory On Cognitive Development Essay733 Words   |  3 Pagesbelieved that in order for any learning to occur there had to development within the individual first, but Vygotsky argued the contrary. He argued that in order for development to occur, the individual would first have to have learning take place through instruction and example in a given appropriate environment. Vygotsky’s theory on cognitive development is centralized on two key ideas known as scaffolding and the zone of proximal development which will be explored in this essay and how they contributeRead MoreVygotsky - Zone of Proximal Development Essay example1322 Words   |  6 PagesHow can Vygotsky’s notion of the à ¢â‚¬ËœZone of Proximal Development’, and the related concept of ‘scaffolding’, be used to provide appropriate education and support to the full range of students in the classroom? Teaching is not just a matter of standing in front of a class and distributing knowledge to a group of learners. Teaching is a much more complex procedure that requires educators to consider a variety of educational components in order to maximize a learner’s true potential. Teachers are responsibleRead MoreVygotsky s Theories Theory Theories994 Words   |  4 PagesPSY112 Assignment #1 Devyn Crocker Vygotsky’s Theories Vygotsky’s theories jumped out at me because I thought that this was an interesting topic of choice.I am very interested in learning how children develop, not only in the classroom, but also outside the classroom. I was curious if a scientist believed that nurture is what helps children to learn and develop instead of just being born that way with nature. In my opinion, the way children are raised is the way they learn and develop their attitudesRead MoreEarly Childhood Course At Savannah Technical College Essay1662 Words   |  7 Pagesspectrum of early childhood, majority of the main focus was on early education. The work of Lev Vygotsky greatly influenced the field of early education. This paper will include a brief summary of Vygotsky’s life, a description of his major ideas, and how those ideas impact early education today. Vygotsky’s Life According to New World Encyclopedia (2014), â€Å"Lev Vygotsky was born was born in Orsha, Belarus (then Russian empire), into a well-to-do family of Jewish ancestry, on November 17 (NovemberRead MoreJean Piaget And Vygotsky And Language Development In Children1748 Words   |  7 Pagesthat there are four main stages in a child’s development that lead to a child learning language. Without these stages, Piaget argues that a child cannot cognitively grow at an appropriate pace (Kaderavek, 2105, p. 18 and p. 23). However, Vygotsky argues the Social Interactionist Theory, which states children develop language through social interacting with adults who are linguistically knowledgeable and the influence of the Zone of Proximal Development (Kaderavek, 2105, p. 18 and p. 23). With includingRead MoreLev Vygotsky Essay1668 Words   |  7 PagesThe psychology theorists of the past have shaped the classrooms of the present. There are many theorists that have affected the teaching sty les of today and a theorist that has had a major impact is Lev Vygotsky. Vygotsky’s work interests me much because his concepts and ideas encompass many of the ways in which teachers teach in today’s classrooms. The ideas he presented have contoured the strategies of teachers. It is interesting to look into the reasons why teachers have adopted some of theRead MoreVygotsky And The Social Development Theory743 Words   |  3 PagesLev Vygotsky and the Social Development Theory Born on November 17, 1896 in Orsha, Russia, Lev Vygotsky entered into a well-educated. (Ghassemzadeh, Posner, Rothbart, 2013, p. 293). Having a banker as a father, Vygotsky was given the privilege of private tutors while young. (Jones, 2003). He went on to study human development at Moscow University and Shanyavsky Open University, and later became a psychologist. (Cherry, n.d.). Vygotsky helped to create an approach to how the human mind is developed

Tuesday, December 17, 2019

The Stolen Child By. Yeats - 940 Words

After examining the poem â€Å"The Stolen Child† by W.B Yeats it can be concluded there are many ways to interpret the meanings within. A main theme that is projected throughout the poem is childhood. Childhood can be generalized as a time spent with friends, having no worries, no responsibilities, while making memories that last a lifetime. In this poem W.B Yeats is attempting to convey that childhood is similar to a fantasy world and that it should be kept that way for as long as possible. Within Yates’ poem we are shown a variety of ways the faeries attempt to lure the child away from his home and family. In the first stanza of the poem the speaker is setting the scene of the poem. Where dips the rocky highland Of Sleuth Wood in the lake, There lies a leafy island (1-3) The speaker describes in the first line of the poem where the faeries are from â€Å"Where dips the rocky highland† (1) a magical sounding place, described using rhyming and soft tone. â€Å"There lies a leafy island† (3) thus giving the impression that the faeries are located on an enchanting island. And the reddest of stolen cherries (8) This is suggesting the concept of stolen fruit to stolen children. The faeries are trying to steal the child away from the world in that he is apart of because its full of heartache and despair than he can understand. In the lines following it’s almost as if the child is being seduced and trying to be taken over by the faeries. Come away, O human child! To theShow MoreRelated The Stolen Child by W.B. Yeats Essay806 Words   |  4 PagesThe Stolen Child by W.B. Yeats   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã¢â‚¬Å"The Stolen Child†, a poem by W.B. Yeats, can be analyzed on several levels. The poem is about a group of faeries that lure a child away from his home â€Å"to the waters and the wild†(chorus). On a more primary level the reader can see connections made between the faery world and freedom as well as a societal return to innocence. On a deeper and second level the reader can infer Yeats’ desire to see a unified Ireland of simpler times. The poem uses vivid imageryRead More Dissatisfaction with Society Revealed in Yeats’ Stolen Child979 Words   |  4 PagesDissatisfaction with Society Revealed in Yeats’ Stolen Child The Stolen Child,a poem by W.B. Yeats, relates the story of a child who is lured away by fairies to a fantasy world illustrated through rich descriptions of nature and the freedom it offers. The plot of the poem becomes a metaphor for the return to innocence that the author feels is necessary in a society that is attempting to lead children away from the mysticism and innocence that characterize childhood, toward a more mundaneRead MoreThe World s More Full Of Weeping Than You Can Understand1395 Words   |  6 PagesFor the world’s more full of weeping than you can understand. (Yeats, 9-12) Yeats displays the faeries as affectionate beings to reveal how the child was able to trust them throughout the journey. Affection is of much important to a child, and the faeries’ affection toward the child allowed them to hold authority over the child when they commanded him to come away with them. The faeries also show the child how intimate they are with one another as they are â€Å"weaving olden dances / Mingling handsRead MoreEssay Analysis of W.B.Yeats The Stolen Child1024 Words   |  5 PagesAnalysis of W.B.Yeats The Stolen Child      Ã‚  Ã‚   The Stolen Child was written by W.B.Yeats in 1886.   The Victorian Era of literature was in full swing, while upstart new poets, dissatisfied with the airy nature of earlier poetic works, began demanding more concrete, realistic, and hard-hitting literature that avoided the metaphorical distancing that the Romantics were prone to.   They scoffed at Yeats, at his romantic views, at his out-dated style of writing.   Frustrated, perhaps even angeredRead More The Poetry of W.B. Yeats Essay examples2304 Words   |  10 PagesW.B. Yeats, a key figure of the modernist movement of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, was born in Dublin in 1865. Although spending much of his childhood and youth in London, Yeats is seen as an inherently Irish literary figure. Through his early work, employing not only ancient Greek myth, but also Celtic legend, he sought to re-ignite in Ireland notions of heritage and tradition, which had diminished through the years. In Ireland, from around 1890 onwards, there was a very noticeableRead MoreWho Goes with Fergus11452 Words   |  46 PagesWho Goes With Fergus This poem is about the dichotomy of the thinker and the actor. Yeats, in love with Maud Gonne, was the thinker, the courtly lover -- the one who would brood upon loves bitter mystery. Yeats was Mr. Nice Guy. Yet Yeats wanted to be the actor - the alpha male - the Fergus. Note the sexualized subtext that permeates the poem, who will pierce the deep woods woven shade? Who will drive with Fergus. Finally, we get the reasons to be the alpha male - the man of action, in theRead MoreAN ANALYSIS OF WILLIAM BLAKES SONGS2960 Words   |  12 PagesConstable Young Books Ltd, London, 1967. His enemies and critics equated Blake ‘with religious fanatics like Joanna Southcote and lunatics like Richard Brothers.’ D Dorfman, Blake in the nineteenth century: His reputation as a poet from Gilchrist to Yeats, Yale University Press, New Haven, 1969, p. 16. 5 Blake’s method of engraving was as ingenious and novel as his style of writing. According to Blake, his brother Robert, who died in early 1787, visited him in a dream and told him the correct methodRead MoreEssay on Media Violence Does NOT Cause Violent Behavior2932 Words   |  12 PagesIn fairy tales, children are pushed into ovens, have their hands chopped off, are forced to sleep in coal bins, and must contend with wolves whove eaten their grandmother. In myths, rape, incest, all manner of gruesome bloodshed, child abandonment, and total debauchery are standard fare. We see more of the same in Bible stories, accentuated with dire predictions of terrors and abominations in an end of the world apocalypse that is more horrifying than the human imagination can even grasp. ForRead MorePolitical Violence in Africa8046 Words   |  32 Pageseasily (and even perhaps inevitably) drawn back into fighting in the next war, thus ensuring that differing layers of political violence concatenate with each other. The experience of the last decade, shows that the governments and groups still using child soldiers are increasingly considered pariahs, and that strategic pressure and the new consensus of international law can protect children from war. The challenge now is to build on the momentum that exists, and to make better use of the existing tools

Monday, December 9, 2019

Time at Large Principle in Works for Multiplex -myassignmenthelp

Question: Discuss about theTime at Large Principle in Works for Multiplex Constructions. Answer: Time is a relevant subject in any industry, making delays in completing works costly and may lead to legal liability for any damage as a result of the delay. This responsibility lies on the party that was responsible for the delay. Multiplex Constructions (UK) Ltd v Honeywell Control Systems Ltd [2013] For instance, if a property developer does not finish his building project on time, it may lead to damages such as loss of rent or a law suit from the prospective tenant as that is a breach of contract. To avoid such occurrences, the contractor will have to ensure the property is finished in time for the tenant to occupy it. To ensure clarity, the following issues are outlined before a building project: The date to begin the works, when the contractor fully possesses the site as well as the date by which it should be completed. This binds the contractor legally such that failure to achieve what was agreed upon will lead to legal consequences and the employer has the right to rescind the contract and sue for damages. Trollope Colls Ltd v North West Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board [1973] 1 WLR 601 In some cases however, time limit may not be valuable in the event where some parts of the contract contradict the time limit, example, if there was a provision allowing for extension of time in the contract. The employer can only sue the contactor if there is delay in completion of works before the specified time, not a delay in works. According to contractual law, the contractor must begin work immediately he gets access to the site. Multiplex Constructions (UK) Ltd v Honeywell Control Systems Ltd [2013] In my view, time at large principle is outdated because there may be other factors causing delays such as additional works and variations. It is unrealistic to expect the contractor to finish the job at the stipulated time if more work is added. It is therefore necessary to allow flexibility in works. References Trollope Colls Ltd v North West Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board [1973] 1 WLR 601, Multiplex Constructions (UK) Ltd v Honeywell Control Systems Ltd [2013]

Monday, December 2, 2019

The All American Girls Professional Baseball League Essays

The All American Girls Professional Baseball League The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League Before we told our daughters that they could be anyone, or anything they wanted to be, we told them that they could only be what was acceptable for women to be, and that they could only do things that were considered ladylike. It was at this time, when the nation was frenzied with the business of war, that the women of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League decided that they could do and be whatever it was that they chose. These women broke free of the limitations that their family and society had set for them, and publicly broke into what had been an exclusively male sport up until that time. To understand the significance of the league (which will further be referred to as the AAGPBL) you must first have an understanding of the role of women in society at this time. Post World War II, women had a very slight role in anything not concerning domestic issues. Public figures and decision-makers were male, and very few women were involved in anything having to with business or politics. Women were expected to be ladylike and well mannered at all times. Because of these factors it was rare to find a woman involved in any type of sport, especially those dominated by males. The start of the war era came on the heels of a decade when women had seemingly taken a step backward in social and economic progress. The depression of the 1930s had devastated the American economy. Women, especially married women, had bore the largest share of the burden. To help male workers get back on the job, national leaders called for married women in two-income families to give up their jobs. Several states had passed laws barring women from holding state jobs. World War II brought drastic changes to the American womans life. The sudden rush to go to war had left the nation with a shortage of manpower. In response to this the government launched an ambitious campaign to convince women to join the war effort. Suddenly women were being called from their kitchens to work in the factories, being told that it was their patriotic duty. The famous Rosie the Riveter image arose from this movement. Rosie became a new image for women, being portrayed as strong, tough, and attractive. It was from this very image that the idea for the league was born. The league was the brainchild of Philip K. Wrigley, president of the Wrigley chewing gum company, and owner of the Chicago Cubs National League baseball team. Wrigley was concerned with the future of baseball. The major leagues had already lost more than half of their players to the military. The minor leagues were even harder hit. By the start of the 1943 season, more than 3,000 minor leaguers had joined the service or the war effort. Only nine of the nations 26 minor leagues had enough men left to play. Aside from this reason, there was concern over the continuation of baseball by several public figures, including President Roosevelt. It was thought that because of the long hours and demanding work of the war effort that it was important for the American people to have a way to blow off steam. In the fall of 1942, Wrigley assigned a three-man team from the Cubs organization to look into developing a professional baseball league for women. His theory was that if Rosie the Riveter could keep wartime factories going, maybe Rosie the Right Fielder could do the same for baseball. After receiving positive feedback for the idea of a womens baseball league, Wrigley dispatched thirty of his baseball scouts to search the U.S. and Canada for top women ball players. When looking for players, scouts were instructed to look not only at ability and talent, but also for women with high moral standing, and femininity. Initial tryouts were held in a dozen major cities. In May 1943 some 280 of them were invited to Wrigley Field in Chicago for the final selection process. In Chicago officials looked on as players were put through a series of tests and in the end 64 women were chosen to be